House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza, Cádiz

The expansive roof of this seaside house in Cádiz, Spain, by Alberto Campo Baeza stretches out towards the shoreline like a flattened extension of the rugged terrain.

House of the infinite, Cadiz

VT House, also known as "house of the infinite", was conceived by Spanish architect Alberto Campo Baeza first and foremost as a piece of landscape architecture, with its architectural elements sunken underneath.

"We have erected a house as if it were a jetty facing out to sea," said the architect. "On this resoundingly horizontal plane, bare and denuded, we face out to the distant horizon."

The building comprises a bulky rectangular box, 20 metres wide and 36 metres deep, although the extensive upper terrace gives the impression that the structure is much larger.

Two storeys are housed beneath the rooftop plane. The front half of these floors emerges from the terrain to meet the beach, while the rear half was created by excavating 12 metres into the rock.

The entire structure was built from travertine stone, which Campo Baeza describes as a reference to Cádiz's Roman heritage.

House of the infinite, Cadiz2

House of the infinite, Cadiz3

House of the infinite, Cadiz4

House of the infinite, Cadiz5

House of the infinite, Cadiz6

House of the infinite, Cadiz7

House of the infinite, Cadiz8

House of the infinite, Cadiz9

House of the infinite, Cadiz10

House of the infinite, Cadiz11

House of the infinite, Cadiz12

House of the infinite, Cadiz13

House of the infinite, Cadiz14

House of the infinite, Cadiz15

Via: dezeen.com

3 thoughts on “House of the Infinite by Alberto Campo Baeza, Cádiz

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *