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The United Kingdom's exit from the European Union is a terrible piece of news for the Costa del Sol, where the British are its biggest and most important customers, and also some of the highest spenders. From now on there are just unknowns and a lot of nervousness.

brexitLast week, the president of the CEA (Andalusian Employers' Association), Javier González de Lara, warned that Britain leaving the European Union would have serious consequences for the Spanish economy, with tourism, although not just tourism, being the main loser.

Since the referendum there's been a 10% fall in the value of the British Pound. This means that Britons' holidays in Spain have become more expensive overnight as, although the Euro has also fallen, it hasn't done so as much as the Pound. This will mean less tourists will visit and less buying power for those that still come. The current average daily spend by the British is 105 euros, higher than the Germans (101 euros) and the French (80 euros).
...continue reading "The effect of Brexit on the Costa del Sol"

The leafy Madrid dormitory town of Pozuelo is Spain’s richest town, while Torrevieja, a run-down resort on the coast of Alicante province, remains the poorest, according to the latest municipal wealth and inequality survey published by the National Statistics Institute (INE).

TorreviejaThe study covers 109 Spanish municipalities throughout Spain, and shows that at €70,298, annual household income in Pozuelo, around 15 kilometers to the northwest of the capital, is five times that of Torrevieja’s €13,977.

Pozuelo is dotted with exclusive gated communities that are home to soccer players and other celebrities. Torrevieja has a significant number of retirees living all year round, many of them from the UK and Germany, and its economy is largely dependent on the summer season.

In general, the north of Madrid is home to the capital’s wealthiest inhabitants: in Majadahonda, ...continue reading "Torrevieja is been named Spain’s poorest town"

Madrid Mayor Manuela Carmena has said that the Chinese-owned Wanda Group still wants to refurbish the capital’s landmark Edificio España building and that it will Edificio España, Madridcontinue working with City Hall to come up with a viable solution to doing so without demolishing its protected façade and flanks, as the group had originally wanted.

The announcement, which came following a meeting between the leader of the leftist Ahora Madrid bloc and Wanda’s head in the capital, Michael Qiao, on Tuesday, contradicts recent reports initially published by Cinco Días newspaper saying that Wanda had on Sunday told Carmena that it was pulling out of the project.

The mayor denied that such a weekend meeting had ever taken place.

According to municipal sources, Wanda chiefs have communicated their intention to continue with the project and a “new round of negotiations” has been opened with City Hall technicians to solve the problems.
...continue reading "Wanda Group still wants to refurbish Edificio España"

Looking ahead to 2016 it looks as if the Spanish house market will continue to recover but the latest data shows it is still a rollercoaster and growth very much depends on location.

Madrid desde CallaoAccording to the latest figures from appraisal company Tinsa prices are still increasing with its latest index up by 1.9% in November year on year.

However, the increase is somewhat exaggerated by an unusual fall in prices last year and on a monthly basis prices were down a fraction compared to September.

The Tinsa index shows, however, that the recovery is broad based as house prices rose in all the areas covered. Prices in Barcelona and Madrid were up by 3%, coastal areas popular with overseas buyers saw price growth of 1.4% and the Balearic and Canary Islands 0.2%.

But the recovery still has some way to go as since the peak of the market house prices are still down 41.3% in general, and 48.2% on the coast.

The Balearic Island saw price growth of 0.9% followed by the Canary Islands up 0.5%, Andalucía up 0.3%, Navarra and Castilla-La Mancha both up 0.1%.
...continue reading "Spanish Property Market Recovery Set to Continue in 2016"

Living in Spain’s most expensive region, Madrid, costs 43% more than in its cheapest, Extremadura, according to a study presented by Jaume García, former head of the Madrid desde CallaoNational Statistics Institute and now a professor at Catalonia’s Pompeu Fabra University.

What’s more, the study, which was commissioned by the Catalan regional government, shows that taking the cost of living into account reduces the disparities in income among the regions.

Without applying any kind of correction, the Basque Country is the Spanish region with the highest GDP per inhabitant (€30,051), while Extremadura has the lowest (€15,133) – a difference of 98%, almost double.

After taking the cost of living into account, the Basque Country remains the region with the highest per capita income (€27,895), but Andalusia moves into last place with €18,058. At the same time, the difference between the top and bottom regions drops from 98% to 54%, according to the report.

The study uses data from 2012 to calculate the purchasing power parity (PPP) of Spain’s different regions – a measure that allows the analysis of an economy’s level of production or wellbeing, cost of living, and poverty while leaving out such factors as variations in prices.
...continue reading "Living in Madrid is 43% more expensive than in Extremadura"