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Luxury properties are hot and running in Spain

"The lack of property finance available and changes to mortgage taxation have led to an overall slowdown in Spanish property sales in the first half of 2011 but the luxury property market has shown more resilience than other sectors of the market, a new report suggests.

International buyers are acquiring luxury properties in Barcelona, the Costa Brava and Ibiza without mortgage financing, according to an analysis of the Spanish luxury real estate markets by Lucas Fox International.

Its report on the first two quarters of 2011 also shows that there is a growth in property investment in Spain from Russian, Dutch, and Swiss buyers and investors. And tourism growth in Barcelona, the Costa Brava and Ibiza in 2011 has had a positive effect on demand for short term rental properties."

propertywire.com

A rural resort in Andalucia, Spain

Andalucia

Andalucía: land of the whitest white and the purest simplicity. Here's a rural resort in Vejer de la Frontera.

“I’m very proud of it. It’s our house, but it’s quite special because it’s one of the few houses in the town which has retained the really traditional style.” - Christina.

Garden

Welcome Beyond

Hong Kong, Brazil or France are in the top list for real estate investment 

Even as the value of residential real estate around the developed world continued its multi-year plunge in the second quarter, some countries bucked the trend. In seven national markets, housing values rose by more than 5 per cent in the second quarter compared to the second quarter of 2010. In two countries, prices rose nearly 20 per cent.

Data from the Global Property Guide for second quarter real estate values around the world reveals values in the U.S. dropped by 9.05 per cent in the period. Predictably, Greece, Spain, Ireland, and Portugal are the other nations with deep housing value problems. In Greece, property values fell 9.9 per cent in the second quarter of this year from the second quarter of 2010. That drop was 15 per cent in Ireland. Each of these European nations has deep deficit problems and has instituted austerity packages, which have tended to hurt growth and employment. Also, each is in the process of being financially bailed out by other nations in the EU.

Among the top countries to invest are: Hong Kong, Brazil, Thailand, Taiwan, Norway, Singapore, France or Switzerland.

Read complete list here: 247wallst.com

Analysis of US stock market situation

Amid a sluggish U.S. job market, a patch-work recovery in the housing market sector, and now damage from Hurricane Irene, it's understandable if U.S. investors are hesitant regarding deploying new money to the stock market.

Conclusion regarding where the Dow Jones is headed, near-term:

Technical Indicators: Neutral. The Dow is firmly below the 50-day (11,937) and 200-day (11,988) moving averages -- which is bearish. However, the Dow, as noted, did hold support at/near 10,700.

Fundamental Indicators: Slightly Bearish. During the second quarter earnings season, corporate earnings were adequate to slightly better than expected.

Monetary Policy: Bullish. Inflation remains low, at the core level (which excludes food and energy prices). Fed will at least continue to reinvest the proceeds of the second stage of it's quantitative easing policy to help stimulate the economy.

Fiscal Policy: Bearish. The U.S. Congress, led by the Tea Party-pressured Republican majority in the U.S. House, implemented austerity measures too soon.

Credit Markets: Recovering, but still strained, with still too many small/medium-sized businesses arguing they're not getting the level of credit they need to expand operations. Home mortgage qualifications terms remain very high.

Europe's sovereign debt situation has improved somewhat, but there could be more financial market ripples if Portugal or Spain require a bailout. So far, each has said they won't need outside intervention funds.

ibitimes.com

Property market to be boost by the selling of public debt

"While a survey of the property market reveals global investors' growing appetite for repossessed homes, it also shows that Europe's poorest countries are worst off as they face rising repossessions while investment falls away.

The countries in the eye of the EU's economic storm – Ireland, Spain and Portugal and Italy – have "the highest net balance reading for likely forced selling," the survey conducted by the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) reads.

In a worsening investment climate this is not good news for the EU's periphery".

euractiv.com