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Hand drawing illustration set of environment sustainable

The concern for the environment and the pressing consequences of climate change have transformed the consciousness of the global society, rescuing the "green conscience" and implementing sustainable measures in areas such as industry, the economy and even housing. The fight against climate change starts at home, anyone can take care of the planet from their own home without major reforms, but based on small gestures and changes in routine. In addition, the European Union itself is committed to environmental wellbeing and, by the end of 2020, every new building of new construction must have almost zero energy consumption, according to the new directive on energy efficiency.

A growing trend that citizens can benefit from, since it also means a high saving in electricity and water bills. But how to be more sustainable without leaving home? In this post we offer a series of tips and tricks to change household habits in a simple way, combat climate change and save on bills.

...continue reading "Tips for a more sustainable home"

Spanish architect Marc Mogas created this prefabricated cottage in Spain's Pyrenees mountains as a cost-effective summer retreat. ...continue reading "Prefabricated wooden home in the Pyrenees by architect Marc Mogas"

The only residential complex in Europe to be given an LEED Platinum certificate, one of the most prestigious sustainable building certifications in the world, is in the Madrid dormitory town of Tres Cantos.

Arroyo Bodonal Residential ComplexIn June, the USGBCI (US Green Building Council Institute) awarded the cooperative of developers behind the project, Arroyo Bodonal, with the international diploma, recognizing its ecological credentials and ushering it into a club of 21 Spanish buildings with LEED certification, including properties owned by multinationals such as Zara, Repsol and Iberdrola, as well as several public buildings and universities.

Consisting of 80 resource-efficient apartments, Arroyo Bodonal was begun 13 years ago and is now inhabited by 225 people, mostly in the 33 to 43 age bracket, who have paid between €127,000 and €350,000 for a home there.

Modestly priced, the project has succeeded in exploding some of the myths surrounding sustainable construction, while reopening the debate over whether building green homes is a viable option in Spain.
...continue reading "Award-winning sustainable residential complex offers affordable, energy-efficient homes"